Even in the worst COVID-19 cases little inflammation is detected

A common question in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) diagnosis has been: why on earth is little inflammation visible? A team of researchers from Aarhus University HospitalCentre for virology and infectious diseases AProfessor at the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Aarhus and soon also from the University of Oxford was at it. It was already known that the level of inflammation differs among patients on an ECGCT scan to a certain extent and even in the very worst cases inflammation can be detected even in the presence of strong antibiotic therapy. So why does the level of inflammation change so much? A team of researchers from Aarhus University HospitalCentre for virology and infectious diseases AProfessor at the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Aarhus is able to answer this question. Denmark is one of the countries that did not have the rapid spread of the COVID-19 disease but the level of disease in Denmark is one of the lowest of European countries. The reason for this is that AProfessor Bor Blomstrand based at the Centre for virology and infectious diseases AProfessor at the University of Aarhus has carried out a retrospective study with nearly 3000 patients taken from the hospital ECG and has examined the measurement of inflammation data together with the information on antibiotic use. The results are published in the journal Radiology.

Our study was able to see that over time the level of the inflammatory marker was reduced and could be affected by the type of cancer the patient had and also by the drug causal agent. In other words we were able to see a change in the markers in the patients. From these results it came to the conclusion that the marker does not change as much over time as the previously assumed belief. It is conceivable that patients who have greater release from the control region still have lower levels of the marker than would be expected if the marker is in a different location on the monitors.

Bor Blomstrand radiologist Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology University of Aarhus.